‘Captain Cooked’ Book Signings – Meet The Author!

Listen, there’s a new book out and it’s an island culinary/romance/mystery novel that got me at its great title. It’s called Captain Cooked.

Full disclosure: I know about this book because its author, Steve Grogan, hired me before publication to review it for Hawaiian cultural accuracy. It’s set here on the Big Island, and he wanted to make sure he had his Hawai‘i facts down.

And so I got to read it early on, and saw that it’s really a fun read. Included throughout the book are really interesting island-related recipes. There’s also geocaching and more. And get this: He has hidden a shark-teeth club somewhere on the Big Island, and the book contains clues as to its location. Find the treasure and win $5000! This book really has it all! (Don’t ask me where the treasure is. I really have no idea.)

He did a similar thing with his previous book, a mystery titled Vegas Die. (Great book titles, huh?!) Nobody found the hidden dagger. Read where it was.

Vegas Die, published by Addison & Highsmith Publishers, has gained recognition as a “Best Seller” in the West, with its special twist featuring a dagger worth $25,000 hidden somewhere in the Las Vegas Valley, with clues to be found within the book. The fictional plot centers around the murders of retired mobsters with the Mayor of Las Vegas becoming the #1 suspect.

Back to his current book: Steve Grogan is going to be here, on the Big Island and O‘ahu, signing books, and you should swing by. I’m going to stop by when he’s at Basically Books in Hilo on Saturday. He is an interesting guy and you should stop by, say hello and pick up a book, which he’ll sign for you.

If you cannot make a signing, you can order Captain Cooked online.

Captain Cooked Book Signing Tour Dates

Big Island

Saturday, February 19th Borders Bookstore, 75-1000 Henry Street in Kailua-Kona 10:30 am (808.331.1668)  — Tentative–check with store

Saturday, February 19th at Basically Books 160 Kamehameha Ave. in Hilo 2 pm (800.903.6277)

Sunday, February 20th   10am, Big Island Geocachers at Island Lava Java restaurant, 75-5799 Ali’i Dr., on Kona Bay in Kailua-Kona – Public welcome

Sunday, February 20th Royal Kona Resort with book cover Tiki artist Brad Parker, 4 pm to sunset,  75-5852 Ali’i Drive, Kailua-Kona

Tuesday, March 1st, Kona Stories in Kailua-Kona 6 pm ‘Words & Wine,’ Keauhou Shopping Center,  78-6831 Ali’i Drive (808.324-0350)

O’ahu

Friday, February 25th,  Pau Hana Meet & Greet with O’ahu Geocachers, 6-8 p.m.  at Kaka’ako Kitchen, 1200 Ala Moana Blvd. (Ward Centre)—Free, public welcome

Saturday, February 26th at Barnes & Noble in Ala Moana Center 1450 Ala Moana Blvd. Suite 1272   11am-2pm (808.949.7307)

Sunday, February 27th at Barnes & Noble at Kahala Mall 4211 Waialae Avenue   (808.737.3323) 1:30 pm-3:30 pm

Please contact book stores and locations to verify times

Please note: due to the impending Borders Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing the Honolulu book signings were cancelled and adjust your calendar accordingly.

Some of the press the book has received so far, and store announcements:

Captain Cooked Recent News Articles, Blogs, Book Store Postings

— as of February 1st, 2011

Craig’s List

http://honolulu.craigslist.org/big/eve/2177754916.html
Honolulu Star Advertiser

http://www.prlog.org/11261704-captain-cooked-book-review-by-star-advertiser.html
Big Island Chronicle

http://www.bigislandchronicle.com/2011/02/01/hawaii-news-get-your-copy-of-captain-cooked-autographed-in-upcoming-book-signing-tour/
Hawaii Life of Luxury

http://www.hawaiilifeofluxury.com/captain-cooked-mystery-book-by-s-p-grogan/
Hawaii Book Blog

http://www.hawaiibookblog.com/?p=5090
Hawaii Star

http://www.hawaiistar.com/2011/01/captain-cooked/
Big Island – Big Island Blog

http://www.bigisland-bigisland.com/author-of-captain-cooked-book-signing-dates-proceeds-to-food-basket-program.html
News Blaze review

http://newsblaze.com/story/20101001054427clar.nb/topstory.html
You Tube Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K9g3GglE-Y
Craig’s List

http://honolulu.craigslist.org/oah/eve/2153723051.html
Native Books – Na Mea Hawaii

http://www.nativebookshawaii.com/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1_12&products_id=4008
Basically Books – Hilo

http://www.basicallybooks.com/upcomingevents.html
The Big Island’s Food Basket Calendar

http://www.foodbaskethi.org/index.php/calendar/
Kahakai Kitchen Blog

http://www.wellsphere.com/healthy-cooking-article/alan-wong-s-whole-tomato-japanese-cucumber-salad-with-li-hing-mui-vinaigrette-for-local-foodie-mystery-captain-cooked/1189654

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Selling The Book

MoneyThis Wall Street Journal article How Authors Move Their Own Merchandise, by Joanne Kaufman, is about how much effort writers put into marketing — selling — their own books these days. It’s out of necessity; the publishing world has changed a lot.

It starts:

To gin up sales for her 2009 essay collection “Bad Mother,” Ayelet Waldman rewarded those who preordered the book with such lagniappes as a donation to a scholarship fund or a copy of a novel by her husband, Michael Chabon. “I think all of that got ‘Bad Mother’ on the New York Times best-seller list,” Ms. Waldman said.

Ayelet Waldman is one author who has learned the benefits of giveaways and social networking.

Eager for lightning to strike twice, she began working the Facebook rolls before last summer’s publication of her novel “Red Hook Road.” Those who preordered (or sent an email explaining their lack of interest in preordering) were entered into a drawing to win an iPod loaded with music thematic to the book. Read more

My favorite is the part about the writer who put up a slideshow on his Facebook page. It showed famous people reading his novel. I just love that. Watch for that when I’m peddling a novel one day.

Read the whole article here.

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Moving The Books: Many Hands DO Make Light Work

picture-1-22-27-24Kohala people are really a smart and capable bunch, and they always have been. Some 1500 years ago, they formed a human chain, many miles long, and passed stones from Pololu Valley, person to person, to where would be built Mo‘okini Heiau.

Archaeologists know this because Pololu is where the stones of Mo‘okini Heiau originated, and also because there is evidence of stones having been dropped along the way.

And now, their descendants and others have proven the practicality of the approach. Over the weekend, they formed a mile-long chain of people and passed more than 15,000 books and other items from the Bond Memorial Public Library to the community’s newly constructed library building, the North Kohala Public Library.

The books were passed, hand-to-hand, for over a mile and then settled into the new library building. It was all completed in a day.

I love this and wish I could have been a part of it.

Sometimes the old ways really are the best.

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Caldecott Books

ox-cart-man1I am a reader. According to my grandmother, when I was young I would set my alarm clock for 30 minutes earlier than I needed to get up for school, just so I could read. I don’t remember that, and as I am also a sleeper I can hardly believe it (though I do).

I do remember that I would stand on my bed at night and rest my book on the windowsill, where I could read by the light of the moon.

Recently, through Facebook, I heard from a person I went all through elementary and high school with. He told me that he has a daughter now who is a voracious reader. He told me that growing up he’d never seen anyone who read so much and enjoyed books as much as I did, and now he sees the same thing in his own daughter. He told me that sometimes when he looks at her he is reminded of me.

I, too, have a child who loves books now, and it is a wonderful thing.

The kindergarteners at her school are doing a “Caldecott Challenge.” That’s where she and the other students have to read at least 10 Caldecott Medal books, and then they get to participate in a special something-or-other at the school’s library.

The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. It was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. Together with the Newbery Medal, it is the most prestigious American children’s book award.

The school library has a bookshelf filled only with books that won the Caldecott Medal, and everyday we have been bringing one or two of those books home and reading them before bed.

What wonderful books. The librarian said something to me about how they do this Caldecott Challenge to introduce kids to other literature, so they aren’t only reading Arthur and Fancy Nancy.

I don’t mind Arthur or Fancy Nancy, but I am charmed to my toes reading most of these award-winning books with the beautiful illustrations. As is my daughter. We look at each picture, and discuss them, and talk about the story. We are really enjoying them together.

Here is a list of all the Caldecott winners (one per year). Really consider picking up some of these books for the children on your Christmas list, or buying from this list for birthdays. These beautiful children’s books are enriching our lives.

Some that we have read and enjoyed recently include:

  • Abraham Lincoln
  • The Little House
  • The Little Island
  • A Tree Is Nice
  • Chanticleer and the Fox
  • May I Bring a Friend?
  • Noah’s Ark
  • Ox-Cart Man
  • The Polar Express
  • Lon Po Po
  • Grandfather’s Journey
  • Officer Buckle and Gloria
  • Rapunzel
  • Flotsam

We both especially liked (if we have to narrow it down) Ox-Cart Man and Flotsam. That was hard to narrow down, and really I’d like to add most of the other books to that list, too.

I know this assignment is for my daughter, but I truly feel like it’s for me, too, because I am enjoying the books so much. It’s like getting to be a kid all over again.

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Wayfinding Through the Storm: A New Perspective on the Controversy at Kamehameha Schools

I just received this press release and am very interested to read this book. What an important story, and what a brilliant idea to put all these people’s accounts of it together in one place. Can’t wait to read it.

Full disclosure: I have written a couple books for Watermark Publishing. But I’d have been interested in this book if it was published on the moon:wayfinding2

Watermark Publishing announces the release of Wayfinding through the Storm: Speaking Truth to Power at Kamehameha Schools 1993 – 1999, offering a new perspective on the Bishop Estate controversy of the 1990s.  Edited by author-historian Gavan Daws in oral history form, this is the story of the ordinary people at the center of the controversy, who looked deep inside themselves and found the moral courage to risk everything, to come together and stand up for what they believed in—to speak truth to power. 
Over 150 voices—young students, respected alumni, movers and shakers, rank-and-file school employees, novice and seasoned teachers, Native Hawaiians, kama‘aina and fresh faces from abroad—share their experiences of the crisis that erupted at Kamehameha Schools and came close to destroying a historic educational community. In the early 1990s, Bishop Estate and Kamehameha Schools were flourishing. Within just a few years, however, a new all-Hawaiian board of trustees found itself embroiled in micro-management and dubious schemes hatched behind closed doors that erupted in public scandal—ethical, moral, sexual, financial, political and legal—and crossed the line into indictable crime.  Introduced by Daws, Wayfinding through the Storm traces these events through interviews with Nä Leo O Kamehameha—the voices of Kamehameha, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, parents and friends—along with court transcripts. The text is supplemented and augmented graphically by a wealth of historically significant photographs, cartoons and documents.  

Scheduled Book Events:

Friday, May 22
Book Launch Celebration
Kamehameha Schools, Kawaiahao Plaza
567 S. King St., Kaiona Room
(Hale Makai, 1st floor near Courtyard)
5PM – 5:30PM — Program
5:30PM – 7PM — Book Sale & Signing
Free and open to the public
 
Saturday, May 30, 1PM – 2PM
Book Signing with Nä Leo O Kamehameha
Barnes & Noble, Kahala Mall
(808) 737-3323
 
Saturday, June 6, 1PM – 2PM
Book Signing with Nä Leo O Kamehameha 
Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana
(808) 949-7307
 

Saturday, June 13, 2PM – 3PM

Book Signing with Nä Leo O Kamehameha 
Borders, Ward Centre

(808) 591-8995Gavan Daws is the author of 14 previous books, including the best-selling Shoal of TimeHoly Man: Father Damien of Moloka‘i; and Land and Power in Hawai‘i. He is also the recipient of several international awards for his documentary films and has been named a Distinguished Historian by the Hawaiian Historical Society. Wayfinding through the Storm: Speaking Truth to Power at Kamehameha Schools 1993 – 1999 by Gavan Daws and Nä Leo O Kamehameha is priced at $24.95 in softcover (ISBN 978-0-9821698-3-4) at bookstores and other retail outlets, online booksellers, or direct from the publisher at www.bookshawaii.net.  Contact Watermark Publishing, 1088 Bishop St., Suite 310, Honolulu, HI 96813; (808) 587-7766; toll-free (866) 900-BOOK; fax (808) 521-3461; sales@bookshawaii.net. 

 

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