The Most Important Thing About Content Marketing

I spent last week at Content Marketing World in Cleveland and it was a great experience.

Content Marketing World

Content Marketing World has become a huge conference and it was very well done. More than 3,500 content marketing specialists attended from 60 countries, as did more than 550 companies, including 40 of the Fortune 100 companies. Two hundred and twenty five content marketing experts spoke.

On the first morning, as we streamed into a large exhibit hall for opening keynote speeches, there was a slight backdrop of drumming in the air which heightened anticipation. Fog rolled and Star Wars music played (the closing keynote speaker was Mark Hamill, a.k.a. Luke Skywalker). The stage was a space ship’s control panel with windows looking out onto the galaxy. Dramatic. I got the sense big things would happen.

Joe Pulizzi, the orange-clad founder of Content Marketing Institute, which puts on the annual conference, spoke first. (The conference color is orange and it’s everywhere.) He talked about a previous content marketing company he founded that failed, he ultimately realized, due to a lack of commitment. The problem: they were not dedicated to being leading experts in content marketing.

Out of that experience came Content Marketing Institute, he said, as well as a dedication to content marketing.

That led into what he thinks is most important to know about content marketing:

“I’ve learned it’s all about commitment. There’s no half way. The meaning of content marketing is that you’re either in or you’re out. There’s no such thing as in between.”

He said that right now just two out of ten global marketers, only 20 percent!, say they are fully committed to their content marketing approach. The other 80 percent is creating a lot of marketing collateral, going through the motions, but not building a loyal audience and not telling a different story. “Meh,” he said.

He told us he was going to title his presentation, “Meh” and the crowd laughed. But he said that’s where so many people are right now.

“We’re doing what looks like content marketing, but are only somewhat committed. Can you be ‘somewhat’ committed to your relationship, to driving, to being a great father?” A slide of Darth Vadar popped up in his slideshow.

“Mediocre content will hurt your brand more than doing nothing at all,” he said.

He pointed to LEGO as a fully committed brand. He mentioned that he used to get the LEGO magazine Brick Kicks 30 years ago, and today his kids still sprawl across the floor with their LEGO blocks.

Content Marketing Rules

These are what many companies see as the current “content marketing rules,” he said:

  • You have to do content marketing
  • Create more content

But the most successful businesses, he said, are

  • Targeting just one audience with one message or mission
  • Telling a different story
  • Maintaining consistency over time
  • Building an asset by creating value outside the products and services they offer

As a content writer helping agencies and brands needing interesting, well-crafted and well-directed content for their clients, as well as developing content marketing for my own brand, these were great reminders.

It was a terrific conference. I learned a lot, met interesting people and am totally re-energized about my work.

Doug Kessler wrote a terrific (and fun to read! he’s a great writer) write-up of the conference from midpoint, as he sat wide-awake with jetlag in the middle of the night.

I had a little experience with that, too.

Great conference.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Photo of a Ghost (Writer)

In my freelance writing business I frequently work as a ghostwriter, and HawaiiBusiness magazine recently featured me in an article about ghostwriting. Megan Spelman, the photographer, told me she wanted to do something a little different with the photo.

She photographed me through a window, while I stood in front of a plumeria tree with hundreds of orchids growing from it.

Leslie Lang Ghostwriter

I think it’s fun how the picture turned out. A bit ghostly indeed!

Speaking of ghostwriting, Ilima Loomis recently interviewed me for a short article that appeared in the regular Hawaii Business magazine column called “My Job.” It was about being a ghostwriter. I love reading those columns, and it was fun to be featured in one of them.

Other recent “My Job” columns featured:

Fun to read.

About Being a Ghostwriter

There are different kinds of ghostwriting. Did you know that ghostwriters wrote many of the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books?

A Guardian.com article about English ghostwriter Andrew Crofts, who has written 80 books that sold 10 million copies, talks about his own book on being a ghostwriter.

I’ve ghostwritten books in the past, but these days I mostly do content marketing ghostwriting. What this often means is writing content in collaboration with a business leader whose name will appear on the article, blog post, op-ed or other piece.

I love doing this kind of work. I really like helping someone corral his or her thoughts and present their message so it’s just right. Very satisfying!

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

NYT on Content Marketing: ‘Single Fiberglass Pool Article Made Over $2.5 Million in Sales’

Did you see this recent and interesting New York Times article on content marketing? It talks about an appliance store in St. Louis, Goedeker’s, which wasn’t doing so well. So the owner had his son and daughter build a website during their summer vacation, and he started taking online courses and reading up on online marketing and search engine optimization.

And it worked. From 2009 to 2013 their sales grew from $6 to $48 million and they went from 18 to 90 employees. Most of their sales now are online.

And that was even before they discovered content marketing in 2013.

From the New York Times article Retailers Try Offering Expertise Online Along With Products by Ian Mount, December 24, 2014:

For its content marketing push, Goedeker’s hired two full-time writers and began publishing daily blog posts about home renovation and appliances, which were then shared on social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus and Pinterest.

Today, the company spends $100,000 to $150,000 a year on its content marketing efforts, according to Mr. Goedeker. He says the goal is for the company to get 80 percent of its online traffic and half of its online sales with its content marketing efforts. So far, sales generated this way have risen from 8 percent to 14 percent of the online total.

“It’s been slow so far,” Mr. Goedeker said. “It takes some patience and persistence. With a paid ad, you get a return on investment immediately. With content marketing, it takes a while for the search engines to recognize your value.”

The number of links back to the company’s website increased from 3,000 in late 2013 to 40,000 today; one blog post, about painting walls with watercolors, got 30,000 visits.

Leslie Lang, Content Marketing WriterThe article also discusses a pool and spa company in Virginia that writes blog posts about questions they hear most from their customers.

In 2009, Mr. Sheridan, an owner of River Pools and Spas in Warsaw, Va., published a post about how much it cost to install a fiberglass pool, a useful piece of data but one most pool companies aren’t eager to publish. Using a web-tracking tool, Mr. Sheridan then followed how many customers came through that post.

“That one single article has made us over $2.5 million in sales,” he said. “For a $5 million-a-year company, that’s a ton of business.”

What an interesting article. It really shows the power of writing compelling narrative copy that resonates with your customers. Sales pitches aren’t what captures people’s attention. You have to engage them. Answer their questions. Make an emotional connection. Compel them to remember your brand and think of you as a resource.

Read the full New York Times article here.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Thanks For All the Fish!

We made it to the end of the month, you and me! I blogged every day in June and successfully completed the Freelance Success 2014 30-Day Blogathon. Thank you for reading, or at least hanging in there. (I only got one “unsubscribe” during the month.)Leslie Lang, Writer, Memoir, Biography, Content Marketing, Hawaii

My goal was to take some of the things out of my head and get them onto my website. I wrote some articles about how much I love the genre of memoir and biography, and a little about some of my work in this area:

And about my other specialization, content marketing, including what that is and some examples of work I’ve done:

And I wrote about books and the power of words:

and a little about Hawai‘i, too:

I will now give you a bit of a break and will stop pelting daily emails at you — though this did get my blogging muscles back in order, I must say, and I will probably be blogging here more often than I had been.

Therefore: “So long!” but only for now, and Thanks for all the fish! (If you don’t know the reference, you should probably read the book.)

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Hitting ‘Send’ on Book Manuscript

Leslie Lang, Writer, Talk Story Press, Publishing, Memoir, Family History, BookTonight I am uploading a family history/memoir manuscript I just completed for a client. We’re publishing it at Amazon’s CreateSpace, which is such a wonderful option for a book like this. He and his wife wanted to put together his mother’s ancestors’ story, an interesting one of a young couple leaving their familiar Hiroshima, Japan to come and work on the former sugar plantations of Hawai‘i.

The back cover explains that this family’s journey “took them from harsh conditions on a small farm in 19th-century Hiroshima to what became a modest but comfortable long-time family home in Hawai‘i. In earlier years, it’s a story of hard work and sacrifice, and in more recent ones, of appreciation and family connection. Always, it’s a story of perseverance in order to build a better future for the ones to come.”

As always (it almost sounds trite, how often I say this, but it isn’t), I loved getting to know this family a bit and learning what makes them tick. This young couple who left Japan in their 20s came to Hawai‘i, worked very hard and sacrificed some more, and built a good foundation for a lot of descendants who are very nice people. The power of family is strong.

These descendants are now, more than 100 years later, about to have a huge family reunion, and will have this book for those who want to know more about how their family came to be. There’s information in this book that I’d wager most of them – or maybe even all of them – don’t know. We dug pretty deep to find some of it.

Family members who want one or more copies of the book will be able to order it directly from Amazon.com. And this means my clients won’t have to buy boxes of books, keep them in their garage and hope they sell. Instead the books will be printed on demand and distributed by Amazon.com, which doesn’t charge you upfront for the service but merely keeps a small portion of each purchase (and it’s very reasonable).

Such satisfying work!

 

 

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

The Sound of Kids Chattering in Hawaiian

I had forgotten about writing this editorial about kids speaking Hawaiian, but stumbled upon it online today (while looking for something else!). It was a long time ago. In fact, I wrote this article during the first year I was freelancing as a writer. The newspaper I wrote it for, the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, doesn’t even exist any more, for crying out loud.

But its archive does, and it was fun to read this again. I thought I’d share the article here:

View Point, Saturday, March 13, 1999

Keeping alive the language of Hawaii

By Leslie Lang

THE boy at the airport was about 5, and his chatter was loud and incessant. It could have been irritating, but it wasn’t. It was great because he spoke Hawaiian.

His father tried to quiet him, but I listened happily. The boy talked about na mokulele nui (the big airplanes), and everything else that caught his eye. I have studied Hawaiian for almost as long as he’s been alive, but I don’t know some of the words he knows.

It thrills me to run across Hawaiian parents speaking with their children in the language of their ancestors, communicating effortlessly in the language most of us have to learn in classrooms and from textbooks.

Hawaiian used to be the language of this land; it isn’t anymore. But it’s coming back.

My boyfriend and I are taking an adult school Hawaiian language class twice a week. The class meets in a Hawaiian language immersion classroom at Keaukaha Elementary School in Hilo, where we sit in tiny orange plastic chairs….

Read the rest here.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Time Travel Incident?

Leslie Lang, Writer, Ghostwriter, Memoirs, Content MarketingDon’t you want time travel to be real? I do. How interesting would that be?!

This article, All The Evidence that Time Travel is Happening All Around Us, is really fun. It opens with a clip from a 1928 Charlie Chaplin movie that shows an extra walking down the street who seems to be talking on a cell phone, which someone only noticed in 2010. There’s a clip from a 1938 movie that shows something similar, too.

My thought: Who would these people who had cell phones, long before cell phones existed, have been talking to?

There are some other good stories on that page. Some are ridiculous and others are fun to lightly contemplate. I’m not a nutter, don’t worry. But I love thinking about it.

And in the meantime, until someone clears it all up for me, I will continue to enjoy good time travel books.

I am, for instance, a fan of Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series of books. A friend and I were talking about these books today. If you aren’t familiar with the series, it starts when a 20th-century English woman leans against an ancient Scottish stone circle, and passes out. When she awakens, she sees what she thinks are period actors around her — but it turns out she’s traveled two hundred years into the past. Gabaldon is a great storyteller and the books are also wonderful novels of historical fiction. Very fun to read (or listen to. The Audiobooks in that series have a great reader).

My daughter and I thoroughly enjoyed reading aloud Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle In Time before bedtime; I remember this book fondly from my own childhood. Now we are working through its sequels (we’re listening to A Swiftly Tilting Planet in the car right now). Those are great time travel books for kids.

And there’s The Time Traveler’s Wife, that was fun to read, and I haven’t read H.G. Wells’s The Time Machine in decades — better reread that — and I also enjoyed Stephen King’s book 11/22/63. That book is very different from his other books: it’s heavily researched historical fiction. He sure knows how to tell a story.

Flavorwire has an interesting article called A Brief History of Time Travel Literature:

A Brief History of Time Travel Literature

Yesterday, Stephen King’s newest work, 11/22/63, a novel about a man who travels back in time via a storeroom to stop the JFK assassination, hit shelves. Inspired by this newest addition to the time travel literature genre, we got to thinking about a few of our favorite time travel stories, and particularly about all of the different ways those fictional mortals manage to thrust themselves back and forth in space-time. From our vantage, there are a few types of time travel that we see used over and over again: mechanical (time machines and the like), portal-based (stepping through some sort of floating hole in the space-time continuum), fantastical (ghosts or other unbelievable phenomena), magical/item-based (some sort of artifact that holds the power of time travel), and the simply unexplained (because why does it matter? Get to the cool future stuff already). There are hundreds of novels and short stories about or involving time travel, so these are a few of our favorites, plucked both from the beginnings of the genre and from contemporary literature….

Click here to read the rest.

This CNN article is called Time Travel: Can It Really Be Done? and is science-y. Did you know that “time runs a little bit faster on the roof, where gravity is imperceptibly weaker, than in the basement, for example”?

This article from Huffington Post is a fun read, too–it’s one columnist’s take on The Top 10 Time-Travel Books. I’m taking notes.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Content Marketing Writing, ‘Whatever That Is’

The phrase “content marketing,” and content marketing writing, are rather new buzz phrases, but creating the stuff isn’t new. “Whether you realize it or not,” writes Forbes.com contributor Jayson DeMers, “chances are your business is already using content marketing as part of your overall marketing strategy.” 
Leslie Lang, Writer, Content Marketing

He wrote a good article about content marketing, what it is, and what types of content typically form a content marketing strategy. He says this includes:

  • Blog posts
  • Guest blog posts
  • E-books
  • Email newsletters
  • PowerPoint presentations
  • Podcasts
  • Standard videos
  • Micro-videos (ie, Vine)
  • Social media posts
  • Live presentations
  • Webinars
  • White papers

As DeMers writes, the primary focus of content marketing is building the relationship, not making a hard sell. It’s the sort of stuff I do over here at my desk.

Read all about it at The Top 7 Content Marketing Trends That Will Dominate 2014.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

‘Writing the Hawaii Memoir’ is Published

Awhile back I was asked to contribute to an upcoming book called “Writing the Hawaii Memoir,” by Darien Gee, and today I received a copy of the book in the mail.

I love the cover, designed to make it look like a Hawaiian composition book. Isn’t it great?  Leslie Lang, Writer, Ghostwriter, Memoir, Biography, Family History, Editor, Hawaii

The subtitle is “Advice and Exercises to Help You Tell Your Story,” and Darien did a great job putting it together.

From Watermark Publishing:

“Your life is so interesting—You should write a book!”

Sound familiar? Thinking of writing your memoir or family history but don’t know where to start? In this invaluable how-to book with tips from more than 20 Hawaii writers and 25-plus writing exercises, you’ll learn how to:

– Brainstorm different themes and ideas
– Build a “bento box” and explore other ways to organize your memoir
– Overcome writer’s block and other challenges
– Deal with issues of libel, “talking stink” and copyright infringement
– Choose the best way to publish your book
– Stay encouraged and motivatedLeslie Lang, writer, biographer, memoir, ghostwriter, Hawaii, editor

Contributing writers include: Billy Bergin, Pamela Varma Brown, Bob Buss, Lee Cataluna, Ben Cayetano, Stuart Homes Coleman, Craig Howes, Patricia Jennings, Frances Kakugawa, Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl, Beth-Ann Kozlovich, Leslie Lang, Gail Miyasaki, Warren Nishimoto, Mark Panek, Laurie Rubin, Phil Slott, Christine Thomas, David Ulrich, Chris Vandercook and Cedric Yamanaka.

Darien is great. She’s the nationally bestselling author of six novels, three written under the pen name Mia King. Her books are translated into fourteen languages and the Doubleday, Literary Guild, Rhapsody and Book of the Month Club book clubs all chose them. She also writes about writing and creativity in her column, “Writer’s Corner,” which appears every week in North Hawaii News, and she teaches writing classes in private seminars and community college programs. She lives on this island and though we haven’t yet met in person, we’ve been acquainted and “chatted” for years now. 

The book looks great and I am eager to read it. I can tell that it’s not fluff — this will be a truly useful book for anyone delving into writing about their life. Darien is an excellent writer and she knows her stuff.

Here’s one of my contributions to the book:

“Include details, and go deeper. How did the thing you’re remembering look, feel, sound, smell or taste? What did it always remind you of? How did your great-aunt always describe it? Looking back, did it fall into some sort of pattern or theme of your life? What is important about it?” – LESLIE LANG

If you’re interested, you can order the book here.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail