The Most Important Thing About Content Marketing

I spent last week at Content Marketing World in Cleveland and it was a great experience.

Content Marketing World

Content Marketing World has become a huge conference and it was very well done. More than 3,500 content marketing specialists attended from 60 countries, as did more than 550 companies, including 40 of the Fortune 100 companies. Two hundred and twenty five content marketing experts spoke.

On the first morning, as we streamed into a large exhibit hall for opening keynote speeches, there was a slight backdrop of drumming in the air which heightened anticipation. Fog rolled and Star Wars music played (the closing keynote speaker was Mark Hamill, a.k.a. Luke Skywalker). The stage was a space ship’s control panel with windows looking out onto the galaxy. Dramatic. I got the sense big things would happen.

Joe Pulizzi, the orange-clad founder of Content Marketing Institute, which puts on the annual conference, spoke first. (The conference color is orange and it’s everywhere.) He talked about a previous content marketing company he founded that failed, he ultimately realized, due to a lack of commitment. The problem: they were not dedicated to being leading experts in content marketing.

Out of that experience came Content Marketing Institute, he said, as well as a dedication to content marketing.

That led into what he thinks is most important to know about content marketing:

“I’ve learned it’s all about commitment. There’s no half way. The meaning of content marketing is that you’re either in or you’re out. There’s no such thing as in between.”

He said that right now just two out of ten global marketers, only 20 percent!, say they are fully committed to their content marketing approach. The other 80 percent is creating a lot of marketing collateral, going through the motions, but not building a loyal audience and not telling a different story. “Meh,” he said.

He told us he was going to title his presentation, “Meh” and the crowd laughed. But he said that’s where so many people are right now.

“We’re doing what looks like content marketing, but are only somewhat committed. Can you be ‘somewhat’ committed to your relationship, to driving, to being a great father?” A slide of Darth Vadar popped up in his slideshow.

“Mediocre content will hurt your brand more than doing nothing at all,” he said.

He pointed to LEGO as a fully committed brand. He mentioned that he used to get the LEGO magazine Brick Kicks 30 years ago, and today his kids still sprawl across the floor with their LEGO blocks.

Content Marketing Rules

These are what many companies see as the current “content marketing rules,” he said:

  • You have to do content marketing
  • Create more content

But the most successful businesses, he said, are

  • Targeting just one audience with one message or mission
  • Telling a different story
  • Maintaining consistency over time
  • Building an asset by creating value outside the products and services they offer

As a content writer helping agencies and brands needing interesting, well-crafted and well-directed content for their clients, as well as developing content marketing for my own brand, these were great reminders.

It was a terrific conference. I learned a lot, met interesting people and am totally re-energized about my work.

Doug Kessler wrote a terrific (and fun to read! he’s a great writer) write-up of the conference from midpoint, as he sat wide-awake with jetlag in the middle of the night.

I had a little experience with that, too.

Great conference.

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I’ve Got ‘Em! or, Five Things to Look for When Hiring a Content Marketing Writer

Good news, people! This article (by someone who’s run a corporate writing agency for 15 years) lists the five things he looks for when hiring content marketing writers and editors – and I’ve got all five covered. Were I to move to Australia, I bet he would hire me.http://www.leslielang.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Screen-Shot-2014-06-20-at-9.55.28-AM.png

It’s all about these five things, he says, which spell WRITE:  Write, Rapport, Interest, Trust and Edit. Click the link to read the whole story, which is from the Content Marketing Institute.

By GRANT BUTLER published JANUARY 8, 2014

How To Hire Effective Content Marketing Writers and Editors

We’ve all heard the theory: It’s easy to hire good content writers because so many are being fired from traditional media, such as newspapers and magazines. Unfortunately, this just doesn’t seem to be the case.

I’ve run a corporate writing agency for 15 years, and hired many writers and editors. During this time, the media industry in Australia (where my firm is based) has been imploding. Australia’s largest newspaper publisher alone has cut hundreds of journalism jobs in recent years. Despite many of those people being among the finest writers in the country, few have become content marketing writers. And there’s good reason why.

How do you evaluate an effective content marketing writer/editor for content “newsroom” positions? How can you determine whether a journalist with a strong portfolio can generate material that’s engaging to customers, appropriate for your organization, and unlikely to create legal or other headaches? I use a methodology I call WRITEWrite, Rapport, Interest,Trust, and Edit. 

Write 

First, be sure your candidates can write. That may sound trite, but you’d be amazed how many people present well and have appropriate resumes, but lack a real aptitude for writing. And be warned, journalists can be published for years and even rise high despite having mediocre writing skills. Their saviors are the bosses and copy editors who fix their spelling, grammar, and even facts.

To avoid getting caught out, ask candidates where they believe their strengths lie; give them short writing, editing and proofreading tests; and ask their references what the person’s first draft copy is like. And be sure to verify they can write quickly enough to meet your needs.

Read the rest.

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