Homepage / Blog / NYT on Content Marketing: 'Single Fiberglass Pool Article Made Over $2.5 Million in Sales'
The Most Important Thing About Content Marketing Photo of a Ghost (Writer) NYT on Content Marketing: ‘Single Fiberglass Pool Article Made Over $2.5 Million in Sales’ Thanks For All the Fish! Hitting ‘Send’ on Book Manuscript The Sound of Kids Chattering in Hawaiian Time Travel Incident? Content Marketing, ‘Whatever That Is’ What Memoir Is About ‘Writing the Hawaii Memoir’ is Published Driving to a Hawaiian Volcano The Magic of Letters What Do You Tell Your Children? Dr. Seuss on Being an Entrepreneur I’ve Got ‘Em! or, Five Things to Look for When Hiring a Content Marketing Writer Memoir: Do You Tell? A Farm Dies Once a Year Content Marketing & Amazing People Mary Karr: ‘For Our People to Do Anything to Generate Income That Won’t Land You in Prison, It’s a Win’ Piecing Together the Memories Investigating a Life – But Whose? Were They Blogging On Cave Walls? The Relationship Between Freelancing & Bonbons Painting Pictures About Hawaii Writing & Reading Memoir Memoir: Isabella Bird in the Sandwich Islands Howie Mandel, My Great-Great-Great Grandfather & Hawaii’s Poi Hawaii Content Marketing & Rock Stars Kahoolawe, 3 Kahoolawe, 2 Kahoolawe, 1 Voyaging Through Time & Space Zinsser, Memoirs & ‘No Project Too Weird’ Editing: One Of My Superpowers The Past, Present & Future of a Time Capsule Swabbing My Cheek For Deep Ancestry Book Review: ‘Reunion, A Search for Ancestors,’ by Ryan Littrell Storytelling For Fun & (Business) Profit Saving Face, & Voice, & Stories Post-Hoopla Report Memoir Reunites Cousins Separated 70 Years Ago Record a Personal History & Stop the World Personal Historian Books on Writing “Gathering Places” Tour a Success! Message From The Dead Q&A With Darien Gee About Her New Novel ‘Friendship Bread’ How Freelance Writing Has Changed, & Why Editors Get What They Pay For Why Personal History Projects Are Important A Library Is Not A Luxury Mile High Books ‘Captain Cooked’ Book Signings – Meet The Author! Contemplation Bookstore Vs. Television Ray Bradbury On Reading & Writing ‘A Book Long Enough’ ‘Books Are Delightful Society’ Copywriting: ‘Leave My Prose Alone’ ‘America Writes Home’ Selling The Book Remembering & Being Remembered Glued To The Screen What She Learned About Jack Love in the Time of Amazon.com Moving The Books: Many Hands DO Make Light Work A Double, No Trouble, Hubbell Bubble Christopher Kimball & The Troll Writing Clearly Leslie’s Funny Bone Has Been Tickled Ways In Which I Am Exactly Like Julia Child The Happiest Photos On Earth Blue Skies A Punctuation Primer: How Do You Use The Demicolon Again? Ciao Bambino! Tsunami! The Little Travelers Princesses, Frogs, Etc. Our Chickens Came First. And Then The Eggs. Caldecott Books 100 x 100 Tales Of The Overhead Bin Thanksgiving Pinatas Refreshing Groundhog Road My Vog Article in Honolulu Magazine Ford Motor Company’s Poet Why I’m Bad At Scheduling Meetings Four Mile Drive Into The Past Place Names of Hamakua It’s The Summer of Exploration Beginning Ukulele Class Hunt Intensifies for $25,000 Dagger! Disneyland Wayfinding Through the Storm: A New Perspective on the Controversy at Kamehameha Schools Twitter Nation I’m at Alltop.com Hilo Vog Dottie Thompson, George Naope, & the Definition of “Resplendent” Live Twitter from the Merrie Monarch 2009 Kahiko Hilo’s Sig Zane and the Ho‘ike

Blog, Content Marketing, Freelance, Headline, Online, Writing

NYT on Content Marketing: ‘Single Fiberglass Pool Article Made Over $2.5 Million in Sales’

Did you see this recent and interesting New York Times article on content marketing? It talks about an appliance store in St. Louis, Goedeker’s, which wasn’t doing so well. So the owner had his son and daughter build a website during their summer vacation, and he started taking online courses and reading up on online marketing and search engine optimization.

And it worked. From 2009 to 2013 their sales grew from $6 to $48 million and they went from 18 to 90 employees. Most of their sales now are online.

And that was even before they discovered content marketing in 2013.

From the New York Times article Retailers Try Offering Expertise Online Along With Products by Ian Mount, December 24, 2014:

For its content marketing push, Goedeker’s hired two full-time writers and began publishing daily blog posts about home renovation and appliances, which were then shared on social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus and Pinterest.

Today, the company spends $100,000 to $150,000 a year on its content marketing efforts, according to Mr. Goedeker. He says the goal is for the company to get 80 percent of its online traffic and half of its online sales with its content marketing efforts. So far, sales generated this way have risen from 8 percent to 14 percent of the online total.

“It’s been slow so far,” Mr. Goedeker said. “It takes some patience and persistence. With a paid ad, you get a return on investment immediately. With content marketing, it takes a while for the search engines to recognize your value.”

The number of links back to the company’s website increased from 3,000 in late 2013 to 40,000 today; one blog post, about painting walls with watercolors, got 30,000 visits.

Leslie Lang, Content Marketing WriterThe article also discusses a pool and spa company in Virginia that writes blog posts about questions they hear most from their customers.

In 2009, Mr. Sheridan, an owner of River Pools and Spas in Warsaw, Va., published a post about how much it cost to install a fiberglass pool, a useful piece of data but one most pool companies aren’t eager to publish. Using a web-tracking tool, Mr. Sheridan then followed how many customers came through that post.

“That one single article has made us over $2.5 million in sales,” he said. “For a $5 million-a-year company, that’s a ton of business.”

What an interesting article. It really shows the power of writing compelling narrative copy that resonates with your customers. Sales pitches aren’t what captures people’s attention. You have to engage them. Answer their questions. Make an emotional connection. Compel them to remember your brand and think of you as a resource.

Read the full New York Times article here.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Comments are closed.